Sunday, March 11, 2018

Have OT services made a difference in your child’s life?
Update!  AOTA Board President has responded to the concerns about the OTD degree requirement.  This is wonderful news!  Click on the link below to hear her message, and if you haven't had a chance, please click on the second link and sign the petition.

I'm an occupational therapist, and I love my profession, but the "powers that be" recently mandated that a doctorate (OTD) degree will eventually be required to enter the field of OT.  This is called “degree inflation,” and it will likely lead to increased costs of care for OT services, the closing of OT programs, and shortages of OTs. No doubt, it will cause irreparable damage to the OT profession! An OTD degree should be an option but not required.
If OT services made a difference in your child’s life or helped someone you care about be more independent with daily living skills, please take 1 minute to click on the link below and sign this petition to stop the OTD mandate.  Thanks so much, and please share!

Sunday, March 4, 2018

Clothespin Activities for Fine Motor Skills

The following clothespin activities will help your child strengthen the fingers, which will likely improve fine motor skills and help with handwriting and other manipulative tasks.  Vary the activity to work on matching colors, improving math skills, and spelling.

You Will Need:
A ruler or paint stirrer
Different colors of Sharpie markers
Different colors of stickers

To Make the Activity: 
Place colored stickers on the clothespins and the paint stirrer.  You can also use a Sharpie to write/draw shapes, numbers, math symbols and letters on the clothespins and paint stirrer. 

Activity Instructions:
Have the child match and place the corresponding clothespins to the sticker colors.
Have the child spell words.
Have the child complete simple math problems.
Have the child can alternate which hands when placing and squeezing the clothespins.
If the child can't differentiate colors/numbers, etc. you can help them identify which one to match.
Position the stick to encourage the child to cross their midline.

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Addressing Auditory Defensiveness

Auditory defensiveness is an over sensitivity to sounds in the environment.  Children with auditory defensiveness may present with some or all of the following symptoms:

* Seems unsettled or distressed in loud environments
* Frequently cover their ears to sounds that other children tolerate
* Are bothered by noises made by things like the vacuum cleaners, hair dryers, etc.
* Avoids activities that have loud environments such as parties, ballgames, and movies.
* Possible language difficulties

Here are several strategies to help children with auditory processing issues.

* Modify the environment by considering the acoustics
* Changing seating arrangements may be beneficial
* Limit extraneous noise from the hallway by closing the door or windows
* It may be necessary to cover the loud speaker with buffering material
* Having rugs or carpet on the floor will decrease echo and extraneous noises
* Whenever possible, children should be forewarned about bells, announcements, fire drills, etc.
* Have the child wear headphones or earmuffs that that cover the entire ear
* Play calming music such as Mozart in the headphones or as background music
* If concentration is an issue, the child should chew gum, suck on sour candies, and/or eat fruit roll ups, or crunchy snacks.
* Therapeutic Listening® is a program that may help a child with issues such as auditory defensiveness, hypersensitivities, sensory modulation, and general organization issues.
For more information, go to and click on parent info.
David Castillo Dominici@Freedigitialphotos

Friday, January 5, 2018

Free Visual Perceptual Skills Worksheets!

Visual perceptual skills are how the brain makes sense of the information the eyes take in and gives that information meaning (for example, finding a toy in a toybox). Visual perceptual skills are important for writing, reading, working math problems, and many other skills!  Enjoy these fun & free worksheets that will help your child work on her visual perceptual skills.

Monday, December 25, 2017

Developmental Milestone Chart: 18 to 24-Months

Your 18 to 24-month old baby is growing and learning new skills quickly. He is likely knows the meaning of simple objects, names items in a book, understands simple verbs.  The following developmental milestone chart will give you an idea of what do expect during the next few months.
 The project above was completed by Master of Occupational Therapy students at The University of Tennessee Health Science Center and posted with permission.

Friday, December 22, 2017

Free Holiday Worksheets for Visual Perceptual Skills!

Here are 4 free holiday worksheets that address visual perceptual skills. Visual perceptual skills are the ability to efficiently process visual information. When a child has visual perceptual problems, it can lead to challenges with writing, eye-hand coordination tasks, memory and attending to task. Enjoy these free visual perceptual worksheets over the holidays!
Have fun!

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Free Visual Perceptual Worksheets: Matching Shapes

Have fum with these free visual perceptual worksheets!

When toddlers explore their surroundings, they discover that certain things have similar characteristics while others are different. They eventually learn to sort items by particular characteristics, and after that, they learn how to match. Your toddler will find it easier to match actual concrete items first, and once she masters items, she will move on to matching pictures. These worksheets will help your child learn about colors and how to discriminate various shapes.